Technopedagogy and active pedagogy

ICT and academic motivation
Technopedagogy is a neologism adopted by the world of education, which reflects an unavoidable reality in the twenty-first century: the integration of ICT into pedagogy. In Quebec, we shamefully realize that the school dropout rate hovers around 30%, despite the fact that governments claim to want to reduce it and are taking a series of measures to achieve it, which, very sadly, prove to be true. little fruitful.

Also, there is a significant divide between digital natives, this new generation of trendy and technologically competent students. They have fallen into the potion and adopt a digital lifestyle, not to say virtual. In contrast, we find teachers, parents who use their devices, in many cases, in an incomplete way. They use them for their primary function (a camera for taking a photo, a cell phone for making calls, etc.). They often consider these devices to be gadgets. These digital immigrants partially integrate ICT into their lives, but nothing more, unlike the youngest who use them fully.

Technopedagogy is thus intended to bring these two solitudes together around a unifying pedagogical strategy, maximized by teachers anxious to renew their professional practice in order to adapt it to the new realities of their clientele, made up of students motivated to learn differently. .

According to studies by Thierry Karsenti , holder of the Research Chair on ICT in Education , there is a direct positive link between the integration of ICT in pedagogy and academic motivation. It appears that the modification of the school context does indeed have an important role to play with school perseverance. Among others, we are talking about:

  • Realization of mobilizing learning placing the student at the heart of the action;
  • Creation of a renewed creative space for both the student and the teacher. In a way, it is the return of the enhancement of educational creativity, on which a new dimension of educational flexibility is based;
  • Return of the fun aspect of teaching. Yes, it is possible to have fun in the classroom and it is not true that learning has to be boring or even painful. Research clearly shows that a student who has fun in the classroom is one who performs better;
  • The importance of networking. Students connect closely with each other. It’s part of their life. They do it virtually, which explains, among other things, the importance they place on their portable electronic devices. They communicate virtually in several spheres of their now digital life: as much in their schoolwork, as in social media as in video games.

The return of fun and creativity in an educational world plagued by boredom and inertia
Following these observations, we realize that ICTs allow us to learn to learn better. We also realize that technopedagogy is impossible to achieve without active pedagogy. It is therefore relevant to claim that the amalgamation of conventional pedagogy combined with the use of technological tools in the classroom is downright a disaster. In order to integrate ICT into pedagogy, this undoubtedly aims a shift.

Active pedagogy therefore implies direct and sustained action with the pupil, which paves the way for differentiated pedagogy. The latter goes a little out of its usual context. Without necessarily denying the need to differentiate his pedagogical interventions according to the students under the responsibility of the teacher, this differentiation is mainly oriented towards the stimulation of creativity in the student by allowing him to carry out a work in the form that it is. interested. The objectives to be achieved and the instructions are indicated. The rest is up to the student who uses his creativity and the tools at his disposal to complete the task the teacher has given him. This is the type of educational differentiation that becomes possible with the technopedagogical perspectives now available to the world of education. But, at first glance, it can scare teachers. How can this active pedagogy be applicable in the current state of affairs where classes are crowded? Impossible for a teacher to be active with everyone at the same time. Hence the importance of establishing the ideal conditions for cooperative education. The contemporary classroom is no longer the field of execution of the dictatorship of knowledge where the teacher has the monopoly of knowledge. It is fertile ground for the co-construction of knowledge. The teacher, admittedly knowing, is above all a strategist of this knowledge, because he directs the pupil towards his discovery. My colleague this can scare teachers. How can this active pedagogy be applicable in the current state of affairs where classes are crowded? Impossible for a teacher to be active with everyone at the same time. Hence the importance of establishing the ideal conditions for cooperative education. The contemporary classroom is no longer the field of execution of the dictatorship of knowledge where the teacher has the monopoly of knowledge. It is fertile ground for the co-construction of knowledge. The teacher, admittedly knowing, is above all a strategist of this knowledge, because he directs the pupil towards his discovery. My colleague this can scare teachers. How can this active pedagogy be applicable in the current state of affairs where classes are crowded? Impossible for a teacher to be active with everyone at the same time. Hence the importance of establishing the ideal conditions for cooperative education. The contemporary classroom is no longer the field of execution of the dictatorship of knowledge where the teacher has the monopoly of knowledge. It is fertile ground for the co-construction of knowledge. The teacher, admittedly knowing, is above all a strategist of this knowledge, because he directs the pupil towards his discovery. My colleague Hence the importance of establishing the ideal conditions for cooperative education. The contemporary classroom is no longer the field of execution of the dictatorship of knowledge where the teacher has the monopoly of knowledge. It is fertile ground for the co-construction of knowledge. The teacher, certainly knowing, is above all a strategist of this knowledge, because he directs the pupil towards his discovery. My colleague Hence the importance of establishing the ideal conditions for cooperative education. The contemporary classroom is no longer the field of execution of the dictatorship of knowledge where the teacher has the monopoly of knowledge. It is fertile ground for the co-construction of knowledge. The teacher, admittedly knowing, is above all a strategist of this knowledge, because he directs the pupil towards his discovery. My colleague Sébastien Stasse illustrates the situation this way on his Twitter account:  The arrival of mobile devices in education can only lead to transforming the role of the soloist teacher into that of the conductor .

If the student is under-stimulated or bored, he or she will need to be distracted. It’s inevitable. And this is not unique to the adolescent, but to all of humanity. The impression of making time is the worst perception that must be evacuated from the world of education, because it is at the base of school disengagement, this form of dropping out of school in the mind.

At the same time, we often hear the same criticisms. Technologies are really games for students. And then ? So much the better if students can combine play, fun and learning. Learning carried out in an atmosphere of fun is more lasting and meaningful for learners, young and old. It is an opportunity to waste time. Indeed, a bored student is one who will waste his time with what occupies or excites him: social networks, games, websites of interest, etc. In this case, two unimaginative solutions are necessary: ​​either that one prohibits these devices in class or that the pupils turn off their devices. A priori, we realize that the constraint has never given convincing results in the school environment. Second, what is the point of having these tools on desks if they are closed? In fact, it is not ICT in the classroom that is a waste of time. It is the boredom caused by courses that are not very stimulating and mobilizing that encourages students to do other things and to drop out of what is done in class. Isn’t it part of human nature to be bored when not very active, stimulated or interested?

Knowledge at your fingertips … in your pockets!
More than ever, the teacher’s role is to teach information processing skills since the knowledge is available at our fingertips, in our pockets. We are seeing an explosion in the availability of information and an overexposure of the media facilitating and shaping our communications. But, as we communicate more and more, the quality of these reports is questionable. The teacher therefore educates the student to make appropriate use of this knowledge in addition to educating him in the ethics of seeking suitable and credible sources. It is, in a way, helping to develop critical thinking.

The teacher is no longer the only pole of knowledge and he must give way to the influx of knowledge in circulation thanks to Google, Wikipedia and their thousands of followers. The teacher who feels professionally diminished in the face of this fact does not realize that in fact, it is rather the nature of his work that is changing.

Also, these teachers addicted to controlling all facets of their class are worried: this democratization of knowledge threatens their classroom management and the conduct of their daily educational activities. ICT is a loss of control over the direction a course can take. Since the horizons are limitless, the paths of knowledge that students can take are certainly beyond the control of the teacher who may not have all the answers to these possible questions. If for some, it is a harsh reminder to humility to realize that we do not know everything, the fact remains that students have the right to achieve learning beyond those already achieved by their teacher. In addition, for other teachers, the prospects for the co-construction of knowledge and the co-production of content are breathless and motivating situations. Shouldn’t we just let go and agree to simply guide and orient the students by agreeing to discover knowledge with them? Finally, if we teach today in the same way as 10 years ago, we may indeed lose control of the classroom. It is at this point that the pupils’ attention is focused on a whole range of completely irrelevant subjects, facilitated by ICT. we may indeed lose control of the class. It is at this point that the pupils’ attention is focused on a whole range of completely irrelevant subjects, facilitated by ICT. we may indeed lose control of the class. It is at this point that the pupils’ attention is focused on a whole range of completely irrelevant subjects, facilitated by ICT.

What is fascinating about technopedagogy is that as much for teachers as for students, everything is in its infancy and that everyone is simultaneously and together discovering the basics of what no longer has limits. It is in a way the transformation of the school environment into a huge laboratory of collaboration and networking all over the place with individuals who, although they master ICT at different levels, all have the same objectives. Take the turn of the 21st century educational revolution.